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How Much is the Andrew Jackson Dollar Coin Worth Today?

Have you come across an Andrew Jackson dollar coin? Are you thinking about adding one or a few to your collection? You’re probably curious about its value. How much is an Andrew Jackson $1 coin worth? This article has all the information you need about the value of the 1829 to 1837 Andrew Jackson coin. You’ll learn about its history and determine whether these coins are worth your money.

The Value of the 1829 to 1837 Andrew Jackson Dollar Coin

Andrew Jackson was one of the earliest United States Presidents, making him a significant historical figure. Some Andrew Jackson gold dollar coins, especially those with known errors, can be worth hundreds or even thousands of dollars. So, let’s dive in and explore this presidential coin!

1797 To 1801 John Adams Dollar Value Chart

If you’re interested in the value of other presidential coins, you might want to check out the 1797 to 1801 John Adams dollar value chart. It provides a comprehensive overview of the different mint marks and their corresponding values.

History of the 1829 To 1837 Andrew Jackson $1 Coin

Andrew Jackson’s rise from poverty, limited education, and military service led him to become the seventh president of the United States. Known as “The Hickory,” Jackson gained prominence for his strong personality, commitment to defending his honor, and advocacy for a powerful federal government and submissive state governments. He achieved notable accomplishments, such as leading the U.S. to victory in the 1812 war in New Orleans against the British and establishing the Dahlonega, Charlotte, and New Orleans United States Mint facilities.

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To commemorate Jackson’s presidency, the U.S. Mint released the 1829 to 1837 Andrew Jackson coin in August 2008 as part of the Presidential $1 Coin Program. This program aimed to celebrate non-living presidents, educate the public about U.S. presidents, and redesign the U.S. dollar coin. Compared to previous presidents, the Mint produced a significant number of Andrew Jackson 2008 dollar gold coins, most of which were released into circulation. While these coins typically hold their face value, uncirculated Jackson coins can be worth more.

Andrew Jackson Dollar Coin

Features of the 1829 to 1837 Andrew Jackson $1 Coin

Let’s explore the unique physical attributes of the 1829 to 1837 Andrew Jackson $1 coin.

The Obverse of the 1829 to 1837 Andrew Jackson $1 Coin

The front side of the 2008 Andrew Jackson dollar coin features a slightly right-facing portrait of the President. The name “ANDREW JACKSON” appears at the top of the coin, while “7th President” is inscribed at the bottom. The dates of Jackson’s presidency, 1829 to 1837, are also displayed. The initials “J.I.” and “J.L.” on the President’s jacket collars represent the coin’s engravers, Joel Iskowitz and Jim Licartez, respectively.

The Obverse of the 1829 to 1837 Andrew Jackson $1 Coin

The Reverse of the 1829 to 1837 Andrew Jackson $1 Coin

On the back of the 1829 to 1837 Andrew Jackson coin, you’ll find the Statue of Liberty. This design is consistent across all the coins in the presidential coin series. The outermost rim of the coin features the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,” while the coin’s value is inscribed on the inner rim to the left of the Statue of Liberty. The initials “D.E.” represent Don Everhart, the engraver of the coin’s reverse side.

The Reverse of the 1829 to 1837 Andrew Jackson $1 Coin

Other Features of the Reverse of the 1829 to 1837 Andrew Jackson $1 Coin

The 2008 Andrew Jackson coin is composed of 88% copper, 6% zinc, 3% manganese, and 2% nickel. It weighs 8.10 grams, has a diameter of 26.50 millimeters, and a thickness of 2 millimeters. An exceptional feature of the presidential coin series, including the Andrew Jackson dollar coin, is its lettered edge. The edge is stamped with the mottos “E PLURIBUS ENUM” and “IN GOD WE TRUST.” Additionally, the coin’s release date and mint mark are located together on the edge. For example, coins minted in Denver will have the date and mint mark indicated as “2008 D.” The edge lettering can come in two positions: A and B. Position A coins have upside-down lettering when the obverse is facing up, while Position B coins have correctly oriented lettering. These differences in lettering led to some of the earliest coin errors in the presidential coin series.

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Edge Lettering

1829 to 1837 Andrew Jackson $1 Coin Value Guides

The 1829 to 1837 Andrew Jackson coin, like most presidential coins, is generally worth its face value. However, several factors influence its value in the market, including the coin’s condition, rarity, demand among collectors, and grading.

In 2008, the Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco mints produced approximately 125,333,940 Andrew Jackson dollar coins as part of the Presidential $1 Coin Program. This resulted in three coin varieties:

  • 1829 to 1837 P Andrew Jackson Coin
  • 1829 to 1837 D Andrew Jackson Coin
  • 1829 to 1837 Proof Andrew Jackson Coin

1829 to 1837 P Andrew Jackson Coin

1829 to 1837 P Andrew Jackson Coin Value

The Philadelphia Mint minted 61,180,000 Andrew Jackson dollar gold coins in 2008. Many of these coins were released into circulation, leaving only a few in mint state. In circulated condition, an 1829 to 1837 P Andrew Jackson coin is worth $1. In higher grades of mint state (MS) 60 and above, the coin’s value rises to between $3 and $5. However, very few mint state 2008 Jackson coins exist. The Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) records the highest graded 1829 to 1837 P Andrew Jackson coin, MS69, which sold at an online auction for an impressive $190.

1829 to 1837 D Andrew Jackson Coin

1829 to 1837 D Andrew Jackson Coin Value

The Denver Mint produced 61,070,000 1829 to 1837 D Andrew Jackson dollar coins as part of the Presidential Coin Program. The majority of these coins were released into circulation. The value of an extremely fine or about uncirculated Andrew Jackson dollar coin is $1. However, at a higher grade of MS60, this coin can fetch up to $3, and a pristine coin graded MS67 can reach up to $370. The highest valued 2008 Andrew Jackson coin, graded MS67, was sold for $537 in 2011.

1829 to 1837 Proof Andrew Jackson Coin

1829 to 1837 Proof Andrew Jackson Coin Value

The San Francisco Mint minted 3,083,940 Andrew Jackson-proof coins in 2008 to commemorate the 7th president of the United States. Compared to other proofs in the presidential coin series, the 1829 to 1837 Andrew Jackson Proof is more abundant. The PCGS has valued almost 10,000 specimens graded from PF69 to PF70. Proof coins in this series graded PF67 are worth only $5, while those graded MS70, the highest possible grade, can fetch as much as $30. PCGS records show that one Deep Cameo PR70 Andrew Jackson dollar coin sold for $170 in 2019.

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As you can see, Andrew Jackson’s coins from 1829 to 1837 do not have high values, even in mint state. Proofs minted using advanced dies and polished to a satin smoothness also do not fetch a fortune. However, these coins can be a nice addition to complete your presidential coin series. While regular strikes and proofs of the Andrew Jackson 2008 coin may not be very valuable, coins with known errors may be worth more.

Andrew Jackson Coin Grading

Several factors contribute to grading the 2008 Andrew Jackson dollar coin. One important factor is the coin’s condition. Coins graded lower than 50 usually fetch lower prices than their face value. Brilliant coins or those considered to be in mint state are worth more. Other factors, including scarcity, collector demand, and errors, can influence the coin’s grading and ultimate value.

Andrew Jackson Coin Errors

Edge lettering errors are common in the Presidential coin series due to the specialized equipment used to stamp the edge lettering on these commemorative coins. Error coins are generally more valuable than regular strike coins, although not all errors hold significant value. The Andrew Jackson 1829 to 1837 coin series has one notable error: the missing edge lettering error.

1829 to 1837 Andrew Jackson Missing Edge Lettering Coin Error

1829 to 1837 Andrew Jackson Missing Edge Lettering Coin Error

This error refers to a coin with a smooth edge, lacking the usual lettering present on coins minted as part of the Presidential Coin Program. Missing edge lettering error coins do not include the release date, mint mark, or the two mottos. There are only a few known 1829 to 1837 Andrew Jackson missing edge lettering specimens, which can fetch up to $180, significantly more than the value of regular strike and proof coins.

FAQ

Is the Andrew Jackson coin worth anything?

The Andrew Jackson coin minted in 2008 as part of the Presidential $1 Coin Program is generally worth its face value of $1. While this coin may be collectible and a nice addition to your collection, it isn’t worth much unless it has a well-known error. In that case, the coin could be worth several hundred dollars.

How old is the Andrew Jackson dollar coin?

As of 2023, the Andrew Jackson dollar coin is 15 years old. It was minted and released into circulation in 2008 to commemorate the 7th president of the United States. The date on the obverse, 1829 to 1837, represents the years Andrew Jackson served as president.

Is the Andrew Jackson $1 coin made of real gold?

No, the Andrew Jackson $1 coin is not made of real gold. Like other U.S. presidential coins, it features a copper core and a manganese-brass cladding, which gives it a gold-like appearance. However, it does not contain real gold.

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