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How Much is a John Adams Dollar Coin Worth Today?

Although regular circulation John Adams dollar coins are only worth their face value of $1, the value of error coins and those in mint condition can be significantly higher. So, how can you determine the value of a John Adams dollar coin? Let’s dive into the world of coin grading, identification, and history to give you a better understanding.

John Adams Dollar Coin Value Chart

Before we delve into the details, let’s take a look at a chart that outlines the value of John Adams dollar coins based on their mint marks and condition.

Mint MarkGood – Extremely FineUncirculated
MS60$1$3
MS63$1$5
MS65$4$5

John Adams P Mint Mark Dollar Coin Value

John Adams P Mint Mark Dollar Coin
Image Credit: usacoinbook

John Adams P mint mark dollar coins are easy to identify as they have a “P” on the edge, indicating that they were minted in Philadelphia. These coins were the most produced in the series, with a total of 112,420,000 in circulation.

Some noteworthy errors with the John Adams P mint mark dollar coins include doubled edge letter overlap errors and missing edge letterings.

History

The John Adams dollar coin is part of the Presidential Dollar coin series program, which was created to honor former Presidents of the United States. This program started on January 1, 2007, and continues to this day. John Adams, born on October 30, 1735, was a founding Father and served as the second President of the United States from 1797 to 1801.

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The Obverse

The obverse of the John Adams dollar coin features a portrait of John Adams, designed by Joel Iskowitz and sculpted by Charles L. Vickers. It also includes inscriptions such as “2nd PRESIDENT,” “1797 – 1801,” and “JOHN ADAMS.”

The Reverse

On the reverse side of the coin, you’ll find a depiction of the Statue of Liberty holding a torch above her head. The coin also displays the inscription “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” and the face value, $1.

The Edge

The edge of the John Adams dollar coin showcases the year of minting (2007), the mint mark, the legend “E PLURIBUS UNUM,” and “IN GOD WE TRUST.” It also features 13 stars.

Details

The John Adams dollar coin is made of an alloy consisting of 6% zinc, 88.5% copper, and 3.5% manganese, with a nickel coating on a pure copper core. It weighs 8.07 grams and has a diameter of 26.5mm. These coins were minted in Philadelphia, Denver, and the San Francisco mint.

Value

In their circulated state, John Adams dollar coins with the P mint mark are valued at $1, regardless of their condition. However, if you have a coin with a visible error or one that is still in mint condition, it can be worth more.

Special Strike Satin Finish coins in this series can be valued as high as $150 in mint states, and an MS66 grade coin with a double edge overlap can be valued as high as $225. It’s worth noting that there are no proof coins for the John Adams dollar coin minted in Philadelphia.

The highest auction record for a John Adams P mint mark dollar coin is held by an MS64 grade coin that was sold for $2300 by Heritage Auctions on November 9, 2011.

John Adams D Mint Mark Dollar Coin Value

John Adams D Mint Mark Dollar Coin Value
Image Credit: littletoncoin

In addition to the Philadelphia mint, the Denver mint produced a significant number of John Adams dollar coins in circulation. A total of 112,140,000 coins bear the D mint mark. These coins may have missing edge lettering errors and double edge lettering errors, which can be overlapped or inverted. Circulation-struck coins in this series were released on May 22, 2009.

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The value of a John Adams D mint mark dollar coin from the Denver mint depends on its rarity and condition. In the uncirculated state, these coins range in value from $3 to $35.

John Adams S Mint Mark Dollar Coin Value

John Adams S Mint Mark Dollar Coin Value

The John Adams dollar coins with the S mint mark are the least produced in the series, with a total of only about 3,965,989 coins. All of these coins are proof coins, as regular strike coins and specimen strike coins were not struck in the San Francisco mint.

Unlike regular strike coins, the edge inscriptions on the John Adams S mint mark proof coins were struck using a segmented three-part collar die. These coins were released into circulation as part of a set containing one each of George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison’s Presidential dollar coins, costing $14.95.

Today, uncirculated Proof sets of the John Adams dollar coins are available and can range in value from $3 to $30, depending on their grade. The highest auction record for a Proof set S mint mark John Adams dollar coin is $127, which was a PR70 grade specimen sold on January 20, 2008, by Heritage Auctions.

John Adams Dollar Coin Grading

When it comes to grading John Adams Presidential dollar coins, it’s essential to examine the obverse, reverse, and edges of the coins. Although most coins in the series are worth less than face value if they are below the uncirculated grade, there are gems worth collecting.

Rare John Adams Dollar Coin Errors List

Coin errors can significantly increase the value of a coin. Here is a list of some of the rarest John Adams dollar coin errors to look out for when collecting:

John Adams Dollar Coin Double Edge Lettering Overlap Error

John Adams Dollar Coin Double Edge Lettering Overlap Error
Image Credit: coins.ha

The double-edge lettering overlap error occurs when the lettering on the coin’s edge appears more than once and overlaps. This error is found in regular strike John Adams dollar coins from the Philadelphia and Denver mints.

Double-edge lettering overlap errors can be worth as much as $300 if the coin is in mint state. Coins with the D mint mark are relatively more challenging to find than those with the P mint mark.

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John Adams Dollar Coin Broadstruck Error

John Adams Dollar Coin Broadstruck Error
Image Credit: pcgs

Broadstruck errors are rare with the John Adams Presidential dollar coins and can be worth as much as $500 when graded. This error occurs when a coin is improperly struck in its retaining collar, resulting in a flattened coin that is thinner than others in circulation.

John Adams Dollar Coin Missing Edge Lettering Error

The missing edge lettering error is quite scarce, especially compared to its Washington counterparts. According to the professional coin grading service, only 1800 of these errors have been graded, compared to 20,000 Washington Presidential coins with this error. All graded errors of this kind are from the Philadelphia mint and include regular strike coins and special strike series. Finding this error can be like hitting gold since it can be worth as much as $900. One of these errors sold for $3335 in 2009 at Heritage auctions.

John Adams Dollar Coin Strike Through Error

John Adams Dollar Coin Strike Through Error

Strike-through errors occur when foreign objects or materials come between the die and the coins during the striking process, resulting in incompletely struck coins with details. Errors of this nature can be worth $5 to $150.

John Adams Dollar Coin Inverted Double Edge Lettering Error

Inverted double-edge lettering errors occur when the coin’s edge letterings appear more than once, facing opposite directions. These errors are common in Philadelphia mint mark coins and can be worth as much as $225.

John Adams Dollar Coin Off-Center Error

Off-center errors are quite rare in the Presidential series and can be worth as much as $1000.

John Adams Dollar Coin FAQs

What is the Most Valuable $1 Coin?

The most valuable $1 coin is the 1794 flowing-hair silver dollar, which is worth $13,311,850. This silver dollar was the first of its kind minted in the United States and features fifteen stars around its periphery, a bust of Lady Liberty on its obverse, and a wreath around an eagle on its reverse. This coin was designed by Robert Scot, while Frederick Geiger executed the letterings.

Is the John Adams Coin Real Gold?

No, the John Adams coin is not made of real gold. It is an alloy of copper, zinc, manganese, and nickel clad onto a pure copper core.

How Many Presidential $1 Coins are There?

There are currently 37 Presidential $1 coins in existence, featuring the images of all former Presidents of the United States. The series does not include Presidents who are still alive.

Can you Spend Presidential Coins?

Yes, you can spend Presidential coins as they are legal tender in the United States. However, since the first set of the Washington Presidential series ended up as stockpiles, they are no longer minted for circulation but rather for historians and coin collectors.

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